Christianity Will Flourish

whitefieldAlthough George Whitefield was a member of the Church of England, he consistently made it clear that he was supportive of anyone who acknowledged Jesus as his or her Savior. Check out this quote from one of his sermons—

“When we confine the Spirit of God to this or that particular church; and are not willing to converse with any but those of the same communion; this is to be righteous over-much with a witness: and so it is, to confine our communion within church walls, and to think that Jesus could not preach in a field as well as on consecrated ground…this is bigotry. … Christianity will never flourish, till we are all of one heart and of one mind; and this would be the only means of seeing the gospel of Jesus not to flourish, more than ever it will by persecuting those who differ from us. … I say it again, I love all that love the Lord Jesus Christ, and esteem him my brother, my friend, my spouse; aye, my very soul is knit to that person.”

How much more the Church would flourish if we all were UNITED in this same attitude!

Advertisements

Love Broadly, Love Deeply

Charles Spurgeon had it right…

C.H. Spurgeon“I am sure, if we shall ever learn the breadth of Christ’s love, our love will grow broad: we shall no longer confine our love to our own church, but shall care for all the churches of God; we shall feel an affection not only for Christians of our own name, but to Christians of all names. Then our love will gain length also. We shall love Christ so that we cannot leave off loving Him. We shall persevere in love, we shall abide in His love as He abides in it. We shall constantly have the flame of our love going up to heaven. And then our love will acquire depth.” —Charles Spurgeon

Join us this Sunday for UNITED as we learn to love more broadly and more deeply. Our UNITED service begins at 11am.

“Forget Having Names!”

In the 1730s, George Whitefield figured prominently in the Great Awakening in America: a revival that swept through the colonies, calling people back to their biblical roots. One day while preaching from the courthouse steps in Philadelphia—

“Father Abraham,” Whitefield cried, as he looked up to heaven, “whom have you in Heaven? Any Episcopalians?”

“No!” Whitfield called out, answering his own question.

“Any Presbyterians?”

“No!”

“Any Independents or Seceders, New Sides or Old Sides, any Methodists?”

“No! No! No!”

“Whom have you there, then, Father Abraham?”

“We don’t know those names here. All who are here are Christians—believers in Christ.”

“Oh, is that the case? Then God help me, God help us all, to forget having names and to become Christians in deed and in truth!

This is what UNITED 2015 is all about… no names, no labels, no denominations.

Just Christians—believers in Christ—worshiping Him together.

Join us Sunday, August 23, 2015 at 11am.

The Strength & The Story In Unity

If you missed our combined UNITED service, here is a recap of Pastor Craig’s message, as he posted it on his blog.

© Lori Oxford Photography

© Lori Oxford Photography

Yesterday I had the honor of speaking at our annual United service in Cedar Springs. I shared something I noticed about the New Testament church: These Christians spent a lot of time together, and that togetherness became a source of strength and told a story to the those watching the Christians.

In passages like Acts 2:42-47 and Acts 4:32-35, we see Christians not only worshiping together, but actively involved in living out their faith. Luke, the writer of the Book of Acts, captures something that Eugene Peterson would summarize this way—

“Christians are a community of people who are visible together at worship but who remain in relationship through the week in witness and service.” 

This was not just Christians helping Christians, but Christians helping all the people in their communities. It was Christians who formed the first:

  • Blind asylums
  • Medical dispensaries
  • Hospitals
  • Orphanages
  • Elderly care home
  • Feeding programs for the poor

And this caught the notice of everyone. Aristides wrote to Emperor Hadrian about the Christians—

“They help those who offend them, making friends of them; do good to their enemies. They don’t adore idols; they are kind, good, modest, sincere, they love one another; don’t despise widows; protect the orphans; those who have much give without grumbling to those in need. When they meet strangers, they invite them to their homes with joy, for they recognize them as true brothers…. When a poor man dies, if they become aware, they contribute according to their means for his funeral; if they come to know that some people are persecuted or sent to prison or condemned for the sake of Christ’s name, they put their alms together and send them to those in need. If they can do it, they try to obtain their release. When a slave or a beggar is in need of help, they fast two or three days, and give him the food they had prepared for themselves, because they think that he too should be joyful….”

The Apostle Paul challenges followers of Jesus to constantly be growing in the outward demonstrations of our faith: to live our lives worthy of God’s calling, to get along with others, and to be making every effort to keep the bond on unity (see Ephesians 4:1-3).

With this in mind I have to ask myself: Am I doing this in my home town? Is there a strength and a story of Christ’s love that is told in my unity with other Christians? Am I helping to address the needs in Cedar Springs? What are people saying about Jesus because of my unity and service with other Christians?